House rules:

The first of my three players handouts (edited for the stolenborrowed revised thief from Grognardia):

Task Resolution

Saving Roles (borrowed from Tunnels & Trolls):

This system replaces the ability check rules from LL.

When you attempt any action not covered by class abilities you will generally have to make a Saving Roll (SR). Describe you intended action to the DM and he well set a level and attribute. Roll 2D6 and add the attribute and your level to the roll. Doubles add and roll over. The target number is 15 + (SR Level x 5). Except for those things restricted to other classes you may try anything and request a SR.

For example, you try to jump over a chasm. The DM decides this is governed by how strong you are and tell you to make a level 2 saving roll versus strength. Your strength is 8 (you’re a wizard) and you’re second level. If you roll two “1s,” you may roll again and add the “2” you already have to the new number; if you roll two “5s” on your second try, you roll again, adding 2 + 10 plus the next result; assuming your result on this third roll was a 5 (a “2” and a “3”), your total would be 2 +10 + 5 + 8 (your strength) + 2 (your level) = 25. Given it was a level 2 SR your target was 25 and you passed (barely). Had it been a level 5 SR the target would have been 40 and you would have failed.

When you make a SR, regardless of success, you score experience points equal to the SR roll total time the level. In the above example you would have gotten 50 XP. Had it been a level 5 roll you would have gotten 125 XP even though you failed.

There are two special SR: bad luck and good luck. They are made against your lowest attribute and your highest attribute respectively.

For those wondering, a first level character with straight average attributes of 10.5 will succeed on a SR1 a little over 1 in 4 times (any initial role of 9+, double 4s, and double 3s are auto success and double 2s and double 1s can succeed over half the time).

Increased Difficulty for Class Abilities:

A variety of class abilities operate as 1-x on a d6. Situations may exist that are harder than normal. In these cases the DM may tell you (or roll on for secret rolls) a d8, d10, d12, etc. Some circumstances may use a d4. Some weird cases, such as monsters who surprise on a 1-3 against characters only surprised on a 1 will be handled by taking the defensive advantage (here chances are 1 lower than normal) and subtracting it from the advantaged party’s higher probability.

Characters:

Alignment:

The alignment system is the system first published in Strategic Review #6 and the Holmes D&D book. It represents the mid-point in the evolution from Law-Neutral-Chaos to the full blown nine alignment system of AD&D. It has the four corners and true neutral but lacks the X-neutral alignments:

Do the creatures (titles?) in the corners and the planes mentioned exist? Good question.

Bonus Spells (a house rule from Gary himself):

Spell casters with Primary Attributes (intelligence for magic users, wisdom for clerics) of 15 or more can cast 1 extra first level spell per day.

Talents (based on T&T 7th Edition):

D&D has had a variety of skill systems of various utilities. The biggest knock on them in the old school community is they limit what characters can do via “do I have the skill” thinking. The idea behind talents is to allow individualized abilities beyond the class system without creating a set of limitations. At all times remember the key idea of the SR system: you may try anything not restricted by class abilities and request a SR.

Talents are a free form ability such as gambling or persuasion or a type of lore such as demons or the cities of Arabis rated 1 or above. Once the DM has assigned the level to a SR you can offer up your talents as being applicable and if the DM agrees you can reduce the level of the SR by the level of the talent (but never below 1). Describe something to me, let me set the SR, and then try and apply the talents or include the talent in your description but never just say Don’t say “I use X to do Y” because I’ll just say “can’t do it”.

At first level and each level after you may take a talent OR raise an existing talent one level. Thieves gain two per level as well as starting with two.

Character Classes:

Unless stated otherwise other class abilities are not changed from standard LL rules.

Magic Users (text taken from Spellcraft & Swordplay by Jason Vey with minor editing):

Arcane Spells: Wizards maintain a spell book full of the arcane formulae by which they make their way in the world. From this book a Magic-user is capable of holding the magical energy of a certain number of spells, determined by level, in his mind for discharge whenever he needs them. Every morning, the Wizard must spend one hour studying his spell book or the magical energy begins to fade and he forgets. As a general rule, any morning that the Wizard does not study, he loses one die worth of spell levels from memory, with higher level spells vanishing before lower level ones. Spells are organized by complexity, or spell level, which is different than character level. To cast a spell, a Wizard rolls 2d6, adding his intelligence ability check modifier, and attempts to equal or better a casting threshold based upon the complexity of the spell (See Wizard Table 1: Spell Casting). Three results are possible:

Spell Level Magic User Level (Immediate/Delayed)
1 2 2 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 16 17 18 19 20
1 11/8 10/7 9/6 8/5 7/3 6/2 5/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/-
2 N/A N/A 11/8 9/6 8/5 7/3 6/2 5/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/-
3 N/A N/A N/A N/A 11/8 9/6 8/5 7/3 6/2 5/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/-
4 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 11/8 9/6 8/5 7/3 6/2 5/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/-
5 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 11/8 9/6 8/5 7/3 6/2 5/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 2/- 2/- 2/- 2/-
6 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 11/8 9/6 8/5 7/3 6/2 5/2 4/2 3/2 3/2 2/- 2/-
7 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 11/8 9/6 8/5 7/3 6/2 5/2 4/2 3/2 3/2
8 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 11/8 9/6 8/5 7/3 6/2 5/2
9 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 11/8 9/6 8/5 7/3 6/2 5/2 4/2
  • If the spell casting roll achieves a result of “Immediate”, the spell goes off immediately, at full effect, as intended.
  • If the spell casting roll achieves a result of “Delayed,” the spell will go off one round after casting is complete.
  • If the spell casting roll fails (rolls lower than the target for a delayed result), the spell fizzles and is erased from memory. The spell cannot be used again until the Wizard engages in his daily spell book studies the following morning. Note that even if a Wizard is guaranteed success, such as a tenth level Wizard casting a first level spell, an unmodified “natural” result of 2 on the spellcasting roll still results in the spell being forgotten, though in his case it will function normally before being erased.

Wizards begin play with 4 spells of first level in their book. These spells are determined randomly or can be chosen by the player costing two spells per spell choosen. Thereafter, at levels 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10, the player adds from 1-3 (d6: 1-2=1, 3-4=2, 5-6=3) new spells of any level that he can cast to his book. Other spells must be researched.

Read Magic: Wizards can read the arcane script used to create scrolls, wards, and runes, and which is used in the writing of spellbooks. Only Wizards can read this writing.

Spell Research and Magic Item Creation: Done using the rules from GAZ 2: Principalities of Glantri. The key points for low level magic users are research costs 1000gp per spell level at a minimum and require a library of magical books with costs starting at 4,000gp for a basic library (which can only allow research of 1st level spells). Magic books found adventuring will have a GP value assigned and, if kept, can be used towards said library. MU players can see me for a copy of the complete rules.

Thieves (text up to talents taken from Grognardia by James M with minor editing):

Thief Abilities: The following replace the abilities listed under Thief Abilities. Those listed under Additional Abilities (read languages, creating a hideout, and read scrolls) are as presented in Labyrinth Lord.

    • Backstab: When attacking from behind, a thief may roll two dice for damage and take the highest result. At fifth level, he may roll three dice and keep the two highest results. At ninth level, he may roll four dice and keep the three highest results.
    • Extraordinary Climbing: A thief can climb sheer surfaces without the need for special equipment. His chances of success are 1-17 on 1D20. This chance increases to 1-18 at fifth level and 1-19 at ninth level.
    • Observant: At first level, a thief detects secret doors and hear noises on a roll of 1-2 on 1D6. This increases to 1-3 at third level, 1-4 at sixth level, and 1-5 at tenth level.
    • Sneaky: Beginning at first level, a thief gains a +1 bonus to surprise when alone or operating with thieves of similar experience. Otherwise, a thief’s surprise chance is equal to that of the least sneaky character in the group. This bonus increases to +2 at fifth level, and +3 at ninth level.
    • Tools of the Trade: When possessed of appropriate tools, a thief can open locks and disable small mechanical traps on a roll of 1-2 on 1D6. This increases to 1-3 at third level, 1-4 at sixth level, and 1-5 at tenth level.
    • Wary: A thief can only be surprised on a roll of 1 on 1D6.

Move Silently, Pick pockets, Hide in Shadows, and Find Traps (as well as removing traps not covered in “Tools of the Trade” above) are lost. They can, however, be obtained as talents.

Talents: Thieves gain two talents each level instead of one.

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